Bullmastiff Puppy Care

The bullmastiff is a big and powerful dog breed, as fearsome as they are protective. A bullmastiff puppy can be a great choice if you want a good guard dog that is as loyal as he or she is brave. This article lists down basic instructions that you can follow in taking care of your bullmastiff puppy.

Nutritional needs of a bullmastiff puppy

A bullmastiff is prone to obesity, which is why you need to keep an eye out on the kinds of food your puppy eats. Choose food that has about 26% or less protein content and 16% or less fat content. As your bullmastiff puppy grows, you will need to make changes to his or her diet in order to adjust to the changing nutritional requirements. Be sure to talk with the vet to see what kinds of food are good for your puppy. This is especially important if your new pet has allergies.

Coat and nail care of a bullmastiff puppy

Because bullmastiffs have short coats, you don’t have to worry that much about maintaining it. Only bathe your bullmastiff puppy when necessary. Use a comb and firm bristle brush to maintain your dog’s coat.

The nails of the bullmastiff puppy should be trimmed regularly. This becomes increasingly important as your puppy grows, as his or her large size can make their feet and nails prone to injury.

Exercising with a bullmastiff puppy

A bullmastiff needs regular, moderate exercise so that he or she won’t become obese. Do note, however, that the breed is prone to lethargy and laziness, so you may need to make the extra effort to encourage your bullmastiff puppy to exercise. Going out on walks or runs regularly is usually sufficient exercise for your dog. Combine this with proper diet to keep your dog from becoming overweight.

Training a bullmastiff puppy

A bullmastiff puppy may be resistant to training, so you need to have lots of patience when it comes to training your pet. It’s also important that you socialize your puppy as early as possible. bullmastiffs were bred to catch poachers, which is why they may have the tendency to knock over people. Make sure to get your bullmastiff puppy used to new situations and people to help them avoid having this aggressive tendency.

Vaccinations

Make sure that your bullmastiff puppy gets all of the necessary shots to make sure that he or she is protected from all sorts of diseases. It’s not enough for your puppy to get one shot; instead, he or she will need to be given a series of shots to keep him or her protected.

Ideally, the bullmastiff puppy should be brought to the vet as early as possible after getting him or her. The vet will then determine the schedule of the follow-up injections. Talk with your doctor regarding worming, flea control, and other such essentials as well to make sure that you’re providing your dog with the best possible care.

Before getting a bullmastiff puppy, make sure that you have the temperament and resources to take care of one. After all, he or she won’t remain a bullmastiff puppy forever, so you need to be prepared to have a large dog in the household.

About Bullmastiff Puppies

The bullmastiffs are a large breed of working class dogs characterized by a sold build and relatively short muzzle. It was bred in the 19th century by the gamekeepers for the purpose of guarding and attacking poachers. They are a descendant of the older breed of English mastiffs and the Old English Bulldog. In 1924, the bullmastiff was recognized as an official breed  of dog.

If you are thinking of having bullmastiff puppies, there are certain things you need to know. bullmastiffs are a very tough breed. It needs a trainer and an owner that can teach the breed how to handle their size and control their strength. Their temper is moderate, but it is always wise to keep your bullmastiff puppies on a leash.

You will find that the bullmastiff puppies will survive and cope well inside an apartment, thanks largely in part to their gentle and kind temperament. The trademark of the bullmastiff are quite similar to their name. They are very strong, very structured, highly alert, bold, and very intelligent.

In the scale of ten, their energy level is at a decent seven. Their looks might be intimidating, but you will be surprised that their affection is quite high with a 9 over 10 rating. They usually have a calm disposition, making them ideal for family dogs. They are also close to very playful.

The bullmastiff puppies are also a very balanced dog. In spite of their playfulness and powerfull trademarks, they also have the tendency to be laid-back, which is a throwback to their older cousin, the English mastiffs. What sets them apart from the English mastiffs apart from their bolder and stronger appearance is their activeness. It is slightly less sleepier than the English mastiff.

The bullmastiff puppies have an average lifespan of 9 years, which is decent for their size. Larger dogs tend to have a shorter lifespan, while smaller and medium dogs tend to live longer. health issues of the bullmastiff puppies are also those that are common to their mastiff cousins. They are prone to obesity, bloating, eye problems, and dysplasia.

They are slightly smaller than their English Mastiff cousins. Their height can reach up to 25 inches to the shoulders on the average, and they can weigh up to 130 lbs. The bullmastiff puppies will grow up to be ideal guard dogs, as they can be protective of their owners, their home, and their territory. They are also quiet dogs to have around, so if you like some peace and quiet, this dog is your best friend. The bullmastiff puppies are laid back, and you will find them lying around your sofa, rug, or even your bed when you arrive home.

bullmastiff puppies grooming is very easy because of their short and smooth hair. Brushing the coat once every other day will do. The breed is always alert, which is one of their best trademarks. If you want a guard for your kids and a silent companion, this dog will do you good.

All About Bullmastiffs

Bullmastiff General Information

Bullmastiffs are large dog breeds originally from England where they were commonly used by gamekeepers for overpowering poachers. This cross breed combines the agility of bulldogs plus the built and power of mastiffs. Although a Bullmastiff has an intimidating size at 25-27 inches, it is known for its docile behavior and great intelligence.

Bullmastiffs are generally characterized by a square skull, broad and dark muzzle that are slightly wrinkled on the sides. Their neck, loin, shoulders, and hindquarters are muscular enough for covering distances within a short span of time. Their dense and short coat has a fawn, red, or brindle hue.

A Bullmastiff does not bark much but are excellent watchdogs because they are fearless in protecting their territory from strangers. Although the breed thinks independently, they have a willingness to please their master and are devoted companions.

Coat Care

Excessive grooming is not needed in Bullmastiffs as minimal brushing is enough to keep their short, waterproof and dense coat clean. Dead hairs can be easily removed with a rubber brush.

Family Life

A Bullmastiff can get along well with children because of its gentleness but it must be socialized with other people at an early age as it has a naturally protective attitude.

An dominant and strong-willed owner is important so that unwanted behaviors can be controlled while they are still young. The dog loves to please its owner and will learn quickly with training.

Lifestyle

Bullmastiffs can adjust quickly to their surroundings and get along fairly well with family members. Owners can provide a zone that dog can consider theirs so that they can retreat to this spot when necessary. This breed can be suited for living in a house or apartment in the city.

Health

Health concerns such as hip dysplasia,hot spots and cancer may afflict your Bullmastiff. Hot spots is usually triggered by moist and warm weather conditions and frequent washing of their coat. This may start as lesions found commonly in the regions surrounding the shoulder, neck, and head.

It is also normal for Bullmastiffs to have allergies to plants, pollen, food, chemicals and flea bites. Your vet can help diagnose the cause behind an allergy but it can sometimes be a trial and error.

Endocarditis can also affect this breed when the dog licks an infected hot spot or the ground such that bacteria enter the bloodstream. The bacteria can also go into the body via a cut. The disease could become worse as these microbes lodge into the Bullmastiff’s heart.

Exercise

This dog breed does not need a lot of exercise though a daily walk can help in preventing obesity.

Training

Obedience classes can help owners to correct any attitude problems. This could also be a good way to teach them when a certain behavior will be tolerated or not.

Since the Bullmastiff willingly pleases their master and have a keen attention, training it to respond to commands would not be hard. Do not growl at it when it does something undesirable. You can reward your Bullmastiff with praises and treats if it did what is required of it.